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Baked Garlic Buffalo Wings

When Football season kicks in (see what I did there? Kick? No? Okay…), it seems like there’s only two options for food: burgers and fries, or wings.  I love me some good ol’ fashioned buffalo wings, fried to perfection and drenched in hot sauce. Boneless or on the bone, they’re so freaking delicious.  I’m of the “ranch dip” type rather than blue cheese, but that’s not a problem in our home.  I’m proud to say that this recipe calls for five ingredients: wings, avocado oil, cassava flour, garlic powder, and hot sauce.  THAT. IS. IT.IMG_4274

I played around on the internet to see how other food bloggers and foodies make their wings, and realized that everyone except for moi have a wire rack.  Rather than running out to the local 99c store to buy a cheap one, I just prayed that a lined baking sheet pan with sprayed aluminum foil would work.  Honestly? It did, and it did taste pretty damn good.  I started by cleaning and pat drying my wings (I got them from an online meat-delivery system Butcher Box, I highly recommend them if you want to ramp up the quality of your meats – plus, they have add ons like bacon and breakfast sausage… mmmm, sausage.)

After drying the wings, I tossed them in avocado oil (this oil has a high smoke point and will not burn in the oven) and coated with a generous layer of garlic powder.  Lastly, I added 1/3 cup of cassava flour to crisp the wings as they bake.  Grease a pan (or use a wire rack) and lay the wings down skin side up, bake for 50 minutes at 400 degrees, and then toss in your favorite hot sauce (I’m not sure of the brand we used but it was really yummy).

The beauty about eating wings is that it is versatile and goes with just about any dipping sauce, any sides, and of course celery and carrots.  Now go throw on your Giants jersey, crack open a Corona, and enjoy them wings!

Creamy Chicken and Wild Rice Soup

I’m a fall girl, 100%.  I could deal with being in warmer weather, if I lived super close to a beach, or in Florida.  Living in New York, and experiencing all four seasons, Fall is absolutely my favorite.  The leaves change, the holidays approach, the smell of pumpkin and apple pie, and SOUP.  I could eat soup everyday, and I love all varieties.  This one in particular reminds me of Panera’s chicken and wild rice, and its hearty, filling, and good for the soul!IMG_4174

I broke out the crockpot for this guy, as I usually do for soups because I love a slow cooked meal, especially in the Fall/Winter seasons.  Crockpot meals are the best because you literally throw everything in at once, checking in every so often, and stir.  With this recipe I used Trader Joe’s Basmati and Wild Rice blend that comes with dehydrated veggies and seasoning, bay leaves, organic chicken breast, fresh carrots, and celery.  For the broth I used 2 cartons of bone broth.  Bone broth is an old tradition of boiling poultry or beef bones, getting all the gelatin and collagen from the bones, for hours (like, upwards of 10-15 hours).  Bone broth has so many benefits and nutrients our bodies need, which is why I’m so glad that it’s readily available in Whole Foods or Trader Joe’s.

I played around with the different lengths of time and temperature, but the end result:  cook on low for 6 hours and add in water or broth as needed.  This recipe in particular requires a good amount of liquid, and a 1/2 cup heavy cream or 1/2 and 1/2 at the end, hence the “creamy” part of the recipe.  I didn’t season with any salt or pepper until it was almost ready to be served, as I wanted to be sure the seasoning wasn’t overpowering.  To create the shredded chicken, I took the chicken breasts out about 30 minutes before the soup was done, shredded with two forks, and added it back in.  Serve with a slice of baguette and you’re ready to feast!

Creamy Chicken and Wild Rice Soup

Course Dinner
Cuisine Soup
Keyword Chicken, Fall, Hearty, Soup, Wild Rice
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 6 hours
Total Time 6 hours 10 minutes
Servings 8 cups
Author nomastehungry

Ingredients

  • 2 lbs Organic chicken breast
  • 1 pkg Wild rice
  • 2 cartons Chicken bone broth
  • 3 stalks Carrots sliced
  • 3 ribs Celery chopped
  • 1/2 cup Half and half
  • 3 Bay leaves

Instructions

  1. Chop/slice the carrots and celery. Set side

  2. Layer the chicken, celery, carrots, and package of rice into a medium size crockpot.

  3. Pour in the cartons of bone broth into the crockpot.  Cover and set to low for 6 hours

  4. Add in more water as need and desired if the liquid becomes absorbed as the soup cooks.  Stir occasionally.

  5. 30 minutes before the soup is done, take out chicken and shred with two forks. Add the chicken back into the soup.

  6. Pour in the 1/2 cup of half and half and season with salt and pepper.  Taste and add more as desired.

  7. Serve with a slice of french baguette and enjoy!

When in Europe, eat everything! Part II: Amsterdam

Proust!

That’s how you say “cheers” in Dutch, as Ian our incredible tour guide told us while we had seven (yes, SEVEN) beers at the Heineken Experience in Amsterdam last week.

I would be remiss if I did not vouch for how beautiful and charming of a city Amsterdam is.  Of course there’s the taboo “coffeeshops” and the Red Light District, but if I’m honest, the food was really spot on and I loved everything we ate during our time in ‘Dam.

*P.S.: I had fries every day in Amsterdam. No shame.*


Amsterdam

  • Loetje Restaurant: This spot was literally right outside of Amsterdam Centraal station and of course we got lost finding it.  We were so hungry!!  After finally stumbling in (and passing it twice…) we sat at the bar: Troy ordered his Heineken and I ordered my champs (shocker, I know).  We sat and ordered the infamous Bitterballen (fried balls of some sort of bechamel sauce with beef in them), Kaasstengels (fried cheese sticks), and burgers with frites in a MAYO. DIPPING. SAUCE. Let me repeat for those in the back…MAYO DIPPING SAUCE.
  • De Foodhallen:  This is incredibly similar to Dekalb Market Hall or Smorgasburg (only indoors).  So many local and delicious vendors rent space to showcase their foods in the south of Amsterdam.  We figured why not, we love food and love walking so let’s combine the two and venture about an hour from the Anne Frank House to eat some food… YASSS. *pictured in order: Shanghai dumplings, pulled pork sandwich on sourdough with slaw, “Fresh and Funky Dog” with tzatziki sauce and relish, chicken kebab pita with the fixings.
  •  Mook Pancakes: We were in need of some sweet and blog-worthy pancakes (or waffles) and research brought us here.  We LOVED our pancakes.  Three large stacks of buttermilk pancakes with banana/chocolate/PB and the other (mine) with grated coconut/banana/strawberries/blueberries. I had to be like the cool kids and get a fresh pressed ginger shot (which nearly killed me) and a cappuccino. So yum!
  • Heineken Experience: Now, this did not involve food but it was one of the highlights of our Eurotrip.  We opted for the VIP tour (#ballin) and got a private tasting in a private bar.  It was unreal.  We learned the history of the beer, the production, how secretive their “A” yeast is, and that really fresh, cold Heineken actually tastes good.  Planning a trip to Amsterdam? You must go here.

     

    Stay tuned for Eurotrip Part III: London…where our AirBnB was a hot mess and we ate at three (yep, three) different food markets!

When in Europe, eat everything! Part I: Paris

The title says it all.  When you are visiting Europe, you are encouraged, no, DEMANDED, to eat everything and take many, many food pictures.

My husband and I went to Italy three years ago for our honeymoon, and we fell in love with the way food made us feel as we shared pizza, pasta, cheese, and so much wine together.  We documented everything in pictures and wrote down each meal we ate.  We decided that every three years we will go back to Europe and do a eurotrip.. this time, we toured France, The Netherlands, and England.


Paris

Tres Magnifique!  I loved this beautifully charming city and all it had to offer with the Eiffel tower, the museums, the shopping, (hello beautiful new neverfull LV bag…), and obviously, the cuisine.  While a lot of the restaurants I had initially researched were closed, we did end up at some pretty awesome spots:

    • Les Deux Magots –> really amazing French fare and quite popular in Paris.  We had breakfast here. (unfortunately, my pictures were of the menu… ( I had the Hemmingway dejeuner)IMG_3117
    • Le Consulat: this restaurant was smack in the middle of Montmartre (super quaint and very historic area in the 9th arrondissement).  This may have been a “tourist trap” but honestly the food was to die for.  We started with french onion soup, followed by this delectable tarragon turkey dish with basmati rice, and Croque Monsieur (ham and cheese) with pomme frites.
  • La Cave Gourmande: This was the ultimate Parisienne restaurant.  Two waiters for the whole restaurant, up a hill in Montmartre, with tables on a major slant (I felt like I was going to roll down the hill…food pun #noshame).  We started with the most savory bone marrow and toast, followed by duck breast and beef bourguignon. I die with how amazing this food was: it was beyond authentic, home made, and tasteful.
  • Osteria Ruggera: Now, this was an italian restaurant, and granted we were in France, but after being told to go to a great French spot and it was closed (because that was our luck), we said screw it let’s just find a place that no one is speaking English. Et Voila!  We found Osteria Ruggera. The aromas from this place brought us back to Firenze, and the food was no exception. (sans pics because we were starving, we started with melanzane di parmigiana, then had linguine con vongole and linguine with carciofo (artichoke))IMG_3149

Stay tuned for Part Deux: AMSTERDAM (and no, it’s not pictures of coffeeshops and spacecakes)