Asian

Chicken and Broccoli Stir Fry

I am a sucker for a good chinese food take out night. The flavor, the greasiness, the dumplings (I am obsessed with dumplings), and the overall deliciousness of the cuisine. I know that American-style chinese food is not necessarily compatible to the real deal in China, and American-style chinese food tends to have a significant amount of sugars, sodium, and soy sauce, which causes my belly to get upset pretty quickly. I have always wanted to dabble at making a stir fry, so I figured tonight was the perfect night to do so.

I love recipes that call for simple ingredients, such as this one. I’ll keep the narrative light on this recipe but will say that I swear by Coconut Aminos. Coconut aminos acts as soy sauce and even sometimes a teriyaki when sugar is added, as it’s made directly from a coconut and has a lot more nutrients than soy sauce. I don’t prefer soy products so this is a great alternative, especially when paired with rice wine vinegar and a toasted sesame oil.

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • 1 bag pre-cut broccoli florets (or two small heads of broccoli cut at the florets)
  • 1 lb chicken breast
  • 3-4 tbsp rice wine vinegar
  • 3-4 tbsp toasted sesame oil
  • 3-4 tbsp coconut aminos
  • 1 tbsp minced garlic
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 bundle of stir fry rice noodles

To start, dice the chicken breasts into smaller bite size pieces. Heat a large pan to medium heat and add in oil and minced garlic. Add the chicken to the pan and begin to cook until all pieces are fully white, they are more than likely not cooked through but the chicken will cook as you layer in the sauce and broccoli. Add the broccoli and the sauces (coconut aminos, rice wine, and sesame oil). I would also add that you can lessen or increase the amount of each sauce as you desire. I also added a sprinkle of salt and pepper and red pepper flakes for good measure and a nice kick! Cover and let sit for a few minutes until broccoli becomes soft, and stirring occasionally.

Meanwhile, Boil 4-5 quarts of water. Add in the stir fry noodles and turn off the heat. Let the noodles soak for 8-10 minutes and add them to the chicken and broccoli. The sauce will start off thin, but as the noodles are added and stirred, the noodles will absorb the sauce so feel free to add a bit more of rice wine vinegar or even 1/4 cup water if you desire. I promise frontloading the 3-4 tbsp of all of the liquids will be just enough.

The results are a lighter, healthier, and umami-satisfying version of the OG Chicken and Broccoli from your local take-out. NOMaste 🙂

Brown Rice Ramen with Sesame Spinach and Bok Choy

If you live in the Northeast, you can attest to how cold it has been recently, and will only get colder this weekend. While I love the idea of falling snow: a blanket of untouched, white glistening flakes of snow, I have a disdain for the slushy-mess post-snowfall. The winter is a take it or leave it kind of season, but does provide us with yummy “winter is here” style dishes (no this was not a reference to G.O.T, but I CANNOT WAIT FOR APRIL!)

Hubs and I tried Ivan Ramen in the city (that is, Manhattan, for the non-local readers) and it was seriously so good. It was the first ramen-bowl I’ve ever had and tasted like a dream (if dreams had a flavor… it would be umami). I recently purchased some ramen from my all-time favorite online market Thrive Market, and decided to try making my own. I saw several people on the Insta making ramen so I thought “This cannot be too difficult to make.” I was right, it really was pretty simple!

You probably know this, but bok choy has some incredible benefits to it: it’s a leafy green, so that is self-explanatory. It also has gut-healing benefits, provides your body folate, calcium, and vitamin B6 too! I never knew how to actually cook bok choy until I woman’d up and just sautéd it in coconut oil, tossed in toasted sesame oil and coconut aminos. I did the same with the spinach, but added some garlic powder. Setting the veggies aside, I started on the broth.

I LOVE bone broth, and am currently trying to find time to make it from scratch, but until then, I’ll use quality bone broth from a carton. I used my thrive bone broth, then threw in some Kettle and Fire chicken mushroom, for some extra umami flavor. I put this in a large pot on high heat until it boiled, then added in the ramen, lowering the flame to simmer/low. The ramen only needs approximately 5-7 minutes. I poured some soup in a bowl, scooped out the ramen, layered in the veggies, and chowed down.

I think for next time, I’ll add some corn, bamboo shoots, and a poultry, like chicken. Stay tuned for an update! Nomaste 🙂

Brown Rice Ramen with Sesame Spinach and Bok Choy

Course Dinner
Cuisine Asian, ramen
Keyword asian, ramen, Soup, vegetables
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Total Time 20 minutes
Servings 6 cups

Ingredients

  • 3 Cartons Bone broth
  • 3 Blocks/Pieces Ramen
  • 2 large Boy Choy
  • 1 cup Baby spinach
  • 2 tbsp Coconut oil
  • 1 tbsp Sesame oil
  • 1 tbsp Coconut aminos
  • Garlic powder to taste

Instructions

For the vegetables

  1. Slice the bok choy so that the leaves are separated from the base of the vegetable.  Cut leaves in halves so they are smaller.

  2. Heat a pan on medium heat.  Add coconut oil

  3. Place bok choy into pan and coat in the coconut oil.  Add in some sesame oil and coconut aminos. Cook until the leaves are fully wilted.  Take out and set aside

  4. Repeat the above steps for spinach, and add garlic powder.  Set aside.

For the ramen/broth

  1. In a large pot, pour three cartons of broth and turn heat on high.  Cook until broth begins to boil.

  2. Add in ramen. Stir.

  3. Once ramen begins to separate, pull apart with a fork and stir.  Cook for 5-7 minutes until noodles are to your liking (al dente).

  4. Ladle soup into a bowl and layer vegetables on top.  Sprinkle with red pepper flakes and serve immediately.

Teriyaki Chicken and Rice

Who doesn’t like teriyaki chicken?  I always think of a bento boxes or lunch specials when I hear the word “teriyaki.”  I’m a sushi girl, but the hubs isn’t a fan, so we compromise and get thai a lot of the time (or chinese food).  This time, I decided to step up my Asian cuisine game and make teriyaki chicken from scratch.  I cannot begin to say how easy (and delicious) this was.  It was literally four ingredients (ok, maybe five when you add in the butter to brown the chicken, but whatever) and made in a #paleo style – with coconut aminos.IMG_3813

“Morg, what the heck is that?”  Well, coconut aminos is a sauce derived from a coconut that acts as a substitute for soy or actual teriyaki sauce.  I don’t prefer soy products nor do I cook with anything made from soy, so this was a perfect fix!  The taste is spot on and is versatile.  I started with slicing and seasoning the chicken with sea salt.  Then adding the chicken to a hot pan with melted butter to brown the chicken.  After most of the chicken was brown, I poured the coconut aminos with some toasted sesame oil (for a nuttier flavor) to the chicken and simmered.

The chicken soaks up all the aminos and oils and turns such a beautifully burnt orange color.  Lastly, I add 1/2 cup of light brown sugar and turn the heat to low.  This simmers for some time to allow the sugar to emulsify and get a little thick.  Taste the sauce to make sure it isn’t too sweet – if so, add a dash of garlic powder (trust me, it’s hella awesome).IMG_3823

Scoop some jasmine or basmati rice aside of a heaping pile of this teriyaki chicken and have at it! Let me know what ya think 🙂 Nomaste